My Journey, Not My Day to Die

Not My Day to Die – Part II

If you are just joining us, you will want to read Part I to catch up.

I finally woke up in the emergency room at the hospital, but had no clue where I was or what had happened. McD said he had never seen me so scared. I tried and tried to re-make the face but it never worked. Apparently when I am really, really scared I thrash about. As I was thrashing about I kicked my Granny in the head, flashed my whole family (all of my clothes were gone at this point), and tried to remove the tubes that were down my throat. Needless to say, they had to restrain me. It took 3 or 4 people to hold me down. I don’t know for sure, because I don’t remember any of this, and I have heard it both ways – 3 and 4. When the restraints did not work completely, I still tried to pull the tubes out of my mouth, they gave me an injection to induce a coma state.

I was taken to the Critical Care Unit and stayed there in a coma state for a few days. During all this time the doctors are running tests and trying to figure out what happened. My chart says I had a Sudden Cardiac Death. Basically, I just dropped dead. That happened on Saturday. Thank goodness I don’t remember anything. My medical chart says I had several blood gasses, where they test how much oxygen is in your blood. They are really, really painful! But I don’t remember them. On Wednesday they moved me to a regular room. Then on Thursday they took me to surgery and implanted an internal defibrillator. If you are not familiar with the defibrillator they are what you see on television on like ER on the crash cart. It has the paddles that they put on you and yell, “Clear” and then shock you with volts of electricity. Mine is smaller and is implanted in my chest on the left side. It has two leads that are connected to my heart and if my heart rate gets too high or too low then it will shock it back into a normal rhythm. It also has a pacemaker, but mine is turned off.

They determined that my heart began beating so fast that it stopped pumping and was basically quivering. Thanks to this little device, I call it my battery back-up, I don’t worry much about it happening again. I cannot go through metal detectors or have the wand used on me at airports. So I am frisked each time. People wonder why I would rather drive, now they know.

The day after my surgery I was able to go home. It was my birthday, and the best birthday present I could ever receive. Although McD gave me a nice gift while I was in the hospital. I will touch on that another time. This is getting rather long again, so I will tell ya about getting shocked another time.

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